Wipo Hague Agreement

The Hague Convention also simplifies the management of a commercial design registration, as it is possible to register subsequent amendments and renew the international registration in a single procedural step. Who filed the highest number of design applications in The Hague in 2019? The term of protection is five years and may be extended by at least five years under the 1960 Act or by two such periods under the 1999 Act. Where the law of a Party provides for a longer term of protection, that Party shall grant protection of the same duration on the basis of the international registration and its renewals to designs that have been the subject of an international registration. In order to facilitate access to the Hague System for designers from least developed countries (TNP), the fees for an international application will be reduced to 10 per cent of the amounts prescribed in their case. An international application may be governed by the 1999 Act, the 1960 Act or both, depending on the Party with which the applicant has the connection described above (hereinafter referred to as the “Party of origin”). The Hague User Guide is your comprehensive reference to the Hague System, which guides you through the different stages of the international registration of industrial designs. The guide contains general information and descriptions of the procedures and requirements of the Hague System with relevant legal citations. A list of Contracting Parties shall be kept up to date by WIPO. The duration of an international registration shall be five years and may be extended by a further five years up to the maximum period permitted by each Party. For the London Act 1934, the maximum duration was 15 years. International design applications may be filed with the International Bureau of WIPO, either directly or through the Industrial Property Office of the Party of origin, if the law of that Party so permits or provides. In practice, however, virtually all international applications are filed directly with the International Bureau, and most are filed via the electronic filing interface on the WIPO website. .

(l) Article 16. (2) of the 1999 Act (no effect of a change of ownership until certain declarations or documents have been received by the Office) The 1999 Act of the Agreement is open to any Member State of WIPO and to certain intergovernmental organizations. . . .